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  Classes of Roger Baklund  >  PHP Indentation Tool  >  README.md  >  Download  
File: README.md
Role: Documentation
Content type: text/markdown
Description: doc
Class: PHP Indentation Tool
Add or remove text to indent and unindent strings
Author: By
Last change: Improved documentation
$ws argument added for set_indents()
arguments $raw_lines, $str renamed to $lines
Date: 9 months ago
Size: 10,023 bytes
 

Contents

Indentation

A few methods for working with text indentation.

blocks($lines)                 -- Input multiline string or array of strings, returns
array of blocks paired with line number reference
indent($lines,$size=2,$ws=' ') -- Add spaces at the start of each line, by default 2
unindent($lines)               -- Remove indentation equally from all lines until at 
least one line starts at position 1
get_indents($lines)            -- Get the number of leading WS characters for each line 
in a multiline string
set_indents($lines,$arr,$append=false,$ws=' ') -- Set individual indentation for each line

Each method is described in more detail below.

blocks()

Splits a string into blocks based on indentation.

~~~~~{.php} function blocks($lines) ~~~~~

This method takes a single argument, a string or an array of strings, like output from file(). The string is split into lines, the indentation of each line is considered, and if it is indented compared to a previous line, it is considered to "belong" to that previous line, the two (or more) forms a "block". Empty lines are ignored. Note that the lines are not made into a single line, the LF is preserved, and the indentation is not removed. This means you can apply blocks() to it's own output to read multiple levels of indentation.

The blocks() method returns an array of arrays. The inner array has two items: the line number from the input source as an integer, and the block as a single string.

~~~~~{.php} $blocks = Indentation::blocks(file('data.txt')); $blocks = Indentation::blocks(file_get_contents('data.txt')); $blocks = Indentation::blocks($LinesArray); $blocks = Indentation::blocks($String); ~~~~~

Note that using constant multiline strings in the PHP source code requires zero indentation for the root items, otherwise it would be seen as a single multiline block. This results in ugly source code:

~~~~~{.php} class foo { function bar() { if($somthing) { $blocks = Indentation::blocks( "First indented Second indented Third indented"); foreach($blocks as $chunk) { list($LineNo,$block) = $chunk; Process($LineNo,$block); } } } } ~~~~~

Use the unindent() method to avoid this problem:

~~~~~{.php} $blocks = Indentation::blocks( Indentation::unindent( "First indented Second indented Third indented")); foreach($blocks as $chunk) ... ~~~~~

indent()

Injects a number of WS characters at the start of each line in the string.

~~~~~{.php} function indent($lines,$size=2,$ws=' ') ~~~~~

This method takes one, two or three arguments. The first is required, it is a multiline string or an array of lines. The second is optional, the number of whitespace characters to inject, the default value is 2. The third argument is also optional, it is which whitespace character to use, by default it will be a space. You could provide "\t" or chr(9) if you wanted to inject TABs, or you could use " " for HTML output.

unindent()

Remove excessive indentation.

~~~~~{.php} function unindent($lines) ~~~~~

This method takes a single argument, a multiline string or an array of lines, and removes excessive whitespace from the start of each line. The first line is a special case: any indentation is removed and ignored. The first line with characters is allways considered to be at the "root level" of the collection of "blocks".

What is excessive indentation?

If all lines in the input (ignoring the first) have X or more whitespace characters at the start of the line, then X spaces will be removed from all lines, so that at least one (the first) line will start at position one on the line.

For example, this:

~~~php Indentation::unindent(" First indented Second indented");

the lines above has 9 and 11 characters indentation

~~~

...results in this:

First
idented
Second
indented

Note that the structure is kept, the entire block of text is shifted to the left. "First" and "Second" has no indentation, lines two and four ("indented") are still indented, but now with only two space characters.

Sometimes the structure is changed, but only for the first line. Any leading whitespace will be removed and ignored when considering the indentation levels.

For example, this:

First 
indented
Second
indented

...is converted into this:

First 
indented
Second
indented

The difference is only in the indentation for the first line, which is handled in this special way for practical reasons.

The blocks() method is used to split a string into blocks based on the indentation. There is a special case when there is only one such block.

Suppose you wanted Second and Third to be indented below First. This will not work:

~~~~~{.php} Indentation::unindent('First Second Third'); Indentation::unindent( 'First Second Third'); Indentation::unindent( 'First Second Third'); ~~~~~

The first two are identical, the linefeed before the ' does not matter. First, Second and Third are considered to be three items on the same level. The third example is less intuitive, the indentation is increased for Second and Third, but it is the same as the two above. All indentation for Second and Third is removed in all cases.

Even this next example is the same as the above, because the indentation for the first line is ignored:

~~~~~{.php} Indentation::unindent(' First Second Third'); ~~~~~

If you wanted to keep the indentation in this case, you would have to leave the first line blank and Second and Third must have more indentation than First:

~~~~~{.php} Indentation::unindent(' First Second Third'); Indentation::unindent(' First Second Third'); ~~~~~

In the last two examples, Second and Third are indentated and 'belongs' to First, only the indentation for First and the initial blank line is removed.

Note that the problem descibed above only occurs when there is a single item with indented lines, both of the below examples will see this as two blocks; First with Second and Third indented, and Fourth:

~~~~~{.php} Indentation::unindent('First Second Third Fourth'); Indentation::unindent(' First Second Third Fourth'); ~~~~~

Even the next example represents the same two blocks, because indentation for the first line is ignored:

~~~~~{.php} Indentation::unindent(' First Second Thirds Fourth'); ~~~~~

get_indents()

Get indentation count for each line in a string with multipe lines.

~~~~~{.php} function get_indents($lines) ~~~~~

This method takes a single argument; the text to analyze in the form of a multiline string or an array of lines. It will return an array of integers. Length of array corresponds to number of lines in the input, and each value represents the number of leading whitespace characters used for that line.

Note: TAB characters counts as one, just like space characters. If they are mixed the numbers does not reflect the indentation you can see in an editor.

Note: In addition to TAB and space characters, ASCII 0, 11 and 13 will also count as one.

set_indents()

Set indentation on individual lines in a multiline string.

~~~~~{.php} function set_indents($lines,$arr,$append=false,$ws=' ') ~~~~~

This method takes two, three or four arguments. The first two are required. The first is a multiline string or an array of lines. This is the text with or without indentation. The second is an array of integers, each represents the amount of whitespace you wish to set or append for each line. The third, optional argument decides if the whitespace should be appended to existing whitespace in the input sting, or if they represent the final indentation you want in the result. The latter is the default, set it to true if you want it to append. The fourth, optional parameter is which whitespace character to use, by default it will use a space character (ASCII 32).

Examples

Example using unindent() and blocks():

~~~~~{.php} $str = " This is a test string spanning multiple lines. It contains three sentences, each are split on three lines. The indentation decides which lines belongs to which sentence."; $str = Indentation::unindent($str); echo '<pre>'.$str.'</pre>'; foreach(Indentation::blocks($str) as $idx => $block) { list($LineNo,$Sentence) = $block; echo '<p>'. 'Sentence '.($idx+1).' from line '.$LineNo.': '. htmlentities($Sentence). '</p>'; } ~~~~~

This would output something like this:

This is a                     
string spanning 
multiple lines.
It contains three 
sentences, each are 
split on three lines.
The indentation decides 
which lines belongs 
to which sentence.

Sentence 1 from line 1: This is a string spanning multiple lines.

Sentence 2 from line 4: It contains three sentences, each are split on three lines.

Sentence 3 from line 7: The indentation decides which lines belongs to which sentence.

You can use the get_indents() method to analyze the indentation of a multiline string.

~~~~~{.php} $indents = Indentation::get_indents($String); $lines = count($indents); $smallest = min($indents); $biggest = max($indents); ~~~~~

Empty lines in the input would be returned as 0 indented. you can not distinguish it from a line with text and no indentation without inspecting the line. Note that the blocks() method automatically removes empty lines, eliminating this problem.