PHP Classes
elePHPant
Icontem

File: application/libraries/dompdf/lib/ttf2ufm/src/maps/unicode-sample.map

Recommend this page to a friend!
  Classes of harold rita  >  PHP Thesis Proposal Hub  >  application/libraries/dompdf/lib/ttf2ufm/src/maps/unicode-sample.map  >  Download  
File: application/libraries/dompdf/lib/ttf2ufm/src/maps/unicode-sample.map
Role: Auxiliary data
Content type: text/plain
Description: Auxiliary data
Class: PHP Thesis Proposal Hub
Store and publish research thesis documents
Author: By
Last change:
Date: 1 year ago
Size: 5,997 bytes
 

 

Contents

Class file image Download
# this file is a sample Unicode map description.
# It describes which glyphs are to be included in the font
# and at which character position they are to be put.

# If the character position is greater than 255, the glyph is included, but
# does not appear in the encoding table (you must then use font reencoding
# to use this glyph).
# That makes it possible to have more than 256 glyphs in a font.
# Currently the maximum supported number of glyphs is 1024.

# Use this file as the argument to ttf2pt1's -L option.

# 1999-11-24 Thomas.Henlich@mailbox.tu-dresden.de
# 2000-03-01 Sergey Babkin: added 3rd format

# comment lines start with '#' or '%' or '//'

# The default source encoding table in the TTF file is Unicode (pid=3,eid=1).
# However a map may specify another source encoding with the "id <pid> <eid>"
# directive. If this directive is used at the beginning of the map file,
# it applies to the whole file. If it is used after a "plane" directive,
# then it sets the source encoding for this particular destination plane
# (possibly overriding the file-wide id directive). The user can also
# specify the source encoding explicitly at the comman line in the
# argument to the option -L. This used-specified source encoding overrides
# any id directives in the map file.

# examples:

# same as Unicode (default)
id 3 1

# One file may contain multiple actual translation tables. Each particular
# table within a file is named a plane. The primary use of planes is
# for multi-plane Eastern fonts with over 256 glyphs: for them one TTF
# file gets converted into multiple Type1 files, with each resulting file
# containing one plane of the original font. But they may also be used
# in other creative ways. Each plane may be specified in different format
# although this is not recommended for aesthetical reasons. If a map file
# contains any specifications of planes then the plane argument MUST
# be specified to the converter with that map file. If a map file
# contains no specifications of planes then the plane argument MUST NOT
# be specified to the converter with that map file.
#
# The plane maps start from the plane directive and continue to the next
# plane directive or end of file. The plane directive must be located
# at the very beginning of a separate string and contain the word "plane"
# followed by whitespace and the plane name. The whitespace characters
# are not allowed in the plane names. Non-alphanumeric characters are
# discouraged in the plane names as well.

# examples:

plane 81
=27	U+0027	APOSTROPHE

plane otherplane
 0, 1, 2


% There is one code assignment per line.
// Three formats are recognized:
# 1. optional whitespace, followed by '=', followed by a hex number
# (character position), followed by optional whitespace, followed by
# 'U+', followed by a four-digit hex number (the Unicode of the glyph we want
# here), followed by any number of characters.

// example:

=20	U+0020	SPACE
=48	U+0021	EXCLAMATION MARK
=22	U+0022	QUOTATION MARK
=23	U+0023	NUMBER SIGN
=24	U+0024	DOLLAR SIGN
=25	U+0025	PERCENT SIGN
=26	U+0026	AMPERSAND
=27	U+0027	APOSTROPHE

=E0	U+042E	CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER YU
=E1	U+0410	CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER A
=E2	U+0411	CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER BE
=E3	U+0426	CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER TSE
=E4	U+0414	CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER DE
=E5	U+0415	CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER IE
=E6	U+0424	CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER EF
=E7	U+0413	CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER GHE

% 2. optional whitespace, followed by '<', followed by one or more
% non-whitespace characters,
% followed by optional whitespace, followed by '/x',  followed by
% a hex number (character position), followed by optional
% whitespace, followed by '<U', followed by a four-digit hex number
% (the Unicode of the glyph we want here), followed by '>' and any number
% of characters.

# example:

<I>                    /x40     <U0049> LATIN CAPITAL LETTER I
<t>                    /x41     <U0074> LATIN SMALL LETTER T
<r>                    /x43     <U0072> LATIN SMALL LETTER R
<o>                    /x44     <U006F> LATIN SMALL LETTER O
<c>                    /x45     <U0063> LATIN SMALL LETTER C
<k>                    /x46     <U006B> LATIN SMALL LETTER K
<s>                    /x47     <U0073> LATIN SMALL LETTER S

<Eu>                   /xA4     <U20AC> EURO SIGN

# 3. optional whitespace, followed by '!', followed by a hex number
# (character position), followed by optional whitespace, followed by
# 'U+', followed by a four-digit hex number (the Unicode of the glyph we want
# here), followed by the name of the glyph that will be used in the
# output file.

# example:

!20 U+0020 space
!21 U+0021 exclam
!22 U+0022 quotedbl
!23 U+0023 numbersign
!24 U+0024 dollar
!25 U+0025 percent

# 4. compact format: just list of unicodes separated by commas or ranges
# denoted by a dash between unicodes. These unicodes are mapped to
# the output codes starting from 0 and continuously increasing.
# It is possible to reset the current code by using the "at" directive
# which must start at beginning of the line and give the new current
# output code (which will be assigned to the next occuring unicode)
# as decimal, hexadecimal or octal in C notation. The "at directive must
# take a separate line. The spaces around unicodes don't matter.

# example: 
# map unicodes 0x40, 0x400, 0x4000 to the output codes 0, 1, 2 and unicodes
# 0xf010 - 0xf020, 0xf030 to the output codes 0x11-0x22

 0, 1, 2
at 0x11
 0xf010- 0xf020, 0xf030


# the first format is used by Roman Czyborra on his fine WWW pages:
# http://czyborra.com/charsets/iso8859.html

# the second format is used in the Linux locale charmaps files:
# /usr/share/i18n/charmaps/*

# we don't need those glyphs in the encoding table
=100     U+0030  DIGIT ZERO
=101     U+0031  DIGIT ONE
=102     U+0032  DIGIT TWO
=103     U+0033  DIGIT THREE
=104     U+0034  DIGIT FOUR
=105     U+0035  DIGIT FIVE
=106     U+0036  DIGIT SIX
=107     U+0037  DIGIT SEVEN
=108     U+0039  DIGIT NINE
=109     U+0038  DIGIT EIGHT